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Foot Pain

Cuboid Fracture

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2 months ago

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by james

Cuboid Fracture Anatomy

The cuboid sits on the outer aspect of the foot, and it is one of seven bones in the foot. It is cube-like in shape, sitting behind the 5th metatarsal and in front of the calcaneus. The cuboid bone plays a significant role in the dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the foot while also being involved in pronation moments of the calcaneocuboid joint.

Picture of the Cuboid Bone

Classifications of Cuboid Fractures

There are 5 main classifications of cuboid fractures that we have outlined below:

Type 1 Cuboid Fracture

An avulsion fracture is where a tendon or ligament pulls off a fragment of bone.

 

Type 2 Cuboid Fracture

A stable isolated extra-articular fracture. This does not need surgery

Type 3 Cuboid Fracture

These are stable, intra-articular fractures and are managed conservatively.

Type 4 Cuboid Fracture

These are associated with disruption to the midfoot alongside tarsometatarsal injuries.

Type 5 Cuboid Fracture

This involves a crushing injury of the cuboid that can be accompanied by disruption to the mid-tarsal joint and the lateral and medial column. Sometimes these are treated conservatively but primarily by surgery.

Symptoms of a Cuboid Fracture

Cuboid fractures present with symptoms of pain on the outside of the foot just above the 5th metatarsal. There is pain on tip-toe walking, running or hopping that can be sharp and immediate in onset. There is often no swelling or visible bruising in the area.

Causes of Cuboid Fracture

 

  • Landing from a jump
  • Repetitive ankle sprains
  • Crush injury from a direct impact

Cuboid Fracture Diagnosis

A conventional x-ray is performed in the initial instance for a suspected cuboid fracture. Still, these are only up to 35% sensitive in the early stages of injury, rising to 70% if scanned 2-3 weeks post-injury. An MRI is often used to confirm a diagnosis. If an x-ray or MRI indicates a cuboid fracture, a CT Scan may be necessary to establish the severity and classification of the fracture.

Cuboid Fracture Treatment

Most types of Cuboid Fracture are treated conservatively under a Physical Therapist’s care. A Physical Therapy protocol involves typically 6 weeks in a walker boot with the first 2 weeks partial weight bear before progressing to full weight bearing. A therapist may perform gentle calf massage to maintain calf length and ankle mobilisations to maintain mobility within the foot and ankle.

When the boot is removed, a graded strengthening, mobility and stability programme commences ensuring full recovery with no secondary complications.

Surgery is rarely recommended, and the cases that require surgery typically type 5 fractures with at least 1mm of displacement. Surgery can involve an ORIF with or without bone grafting.

How long does it take a Fractured Cuboid to heal?

It takes 6 weeks for a Cuboid fracture to heal in a walker boot and an extra 6 weeks of rehabilitation with a Physical Therapist for complete recovery from a cuboid fracture.

Can I walk with a Cuboid Fracture?

You can walk short distances of 10-15minutes in a walker boot with a cuboid fracture. The pain levels should dictate the time or distance; if pain levels increase, you should consider less walking or using an aid such as crutches to reduce the amount of weight placed through the foot.

Physiotherapy with James McCormack

This is not medical advice. We recommend a consultation with a medical professional such as James McCormack. He offers Online Physiotherapy Appointments for £45.

 

Related Article: Cuboid Syndrome

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